Create Custom Record Fields

This page explains how to create custom record fields in your record type with data sync enabled.

Overview

One of the benefits of syncing your data into Appian is that you can make changes in your applications faster, and this benefit applies to changes to your data as well. When you enable sync, you can extend your data by transforming and manipulating existing record data into new custom record fields.

Custom record fields allow you to use predefined templates or free-form expressions to easily define how your record data is calculated, simplified, or transformed, then present those values as new fields in your record type.

In the past, if you wanted to transform your data, you'd need to create expression rules to query and manipulate your data, and then reference these rules throughout your applications. Alternatively, you may have transformed this data outside of Appian using complex SQL statements to create database views. Now, you can avoid creating elaborate queries in a database view or in Appian by creating custom record fields.

For example, say you have a Support Case record type that has the record fields dateSubmitted and dateClosed, and you want to know which tickets took longer than 7 days to close. Instead of creating an expression rule or a database view to continuously calculate this value, you can create a custom record field called slaStatus.

Using a low-code template, you can calculate the difference between the ticket's submitted date and its closed date, then display values as On Time when a ticket is open less than 7 days, and Late when a ticket is open longer than 7 days. You can even account for tickets that are still in progress using a display value, so any tickets without a closed date display as In Progress.

Once you create a custom record field, the field is available on the record type and the values are cached in Appian. This allows you to reference custom record fields as quickly and easily as any other record field in the record type–no additional properties or queries necessary. With simple record type field references, you can leverage your custom record fields in grids, reports, user filters, and more.

Back in our example, the Support Case record type can now display the slaStatus field as another column in a read-only grid, and even filter and sort the list by slaStatus. You can also create reports that shows the number of cases by status, or which support engineers close the most cases on time. To learn how to leverage records in your reports, see Configure Charts Using Records or Configure Read-Only Grids.

Create custom record fields

Custom record fields can be created on any record type that has data sync enabled.

You can create a custom record field using any of the record fields in the record type. References to related record fields or other existing custom record fields are not currently supported in the custom record field configuration.

Record types with sync enabled can only have 100 fields, and no more than 20 of them can be custom record fields. For example, if your record type has 98 fields, you can only create two custom record fields.

To create a custom record field:

  1. Open a record type that has data sync enabled.
  2. On the Data Model page, click NEW CUSTOM RECORD FIELD.
  3. From SELECT A TEMPLATE, choose a template to guide you through the configuration process, or select Write Your Own Expression to use Expression Mode to configure the field.
  4. Click NEXT.
  5. Under CONFIGURE VALUES, follow the template or create an expression using supported functions to configure the custom record field values.
  6. Click TEST to preview your custom record field values using your record data or test values.
    • Select View Record Data to test your configuration against your existing record fields. This is selected by default, and is useful when you already have production-like data in your environment.
    • Select Enter Test Values to return custom record field values based on sample values. You can test up to five values. This option is useful when you want to test specific scenarios, or if you don't have data in your environment.
  7. Click NEXT.
  8. Under SET NAME AND TYPE, enter a name for the custom record field. This is how you'll reference the field throughout your applications. If you use a template, the name will default to the record field used in the configuration appended with the template name.
  9. From the Type dropdown, select the data type for the custom record field. If you use a template, the type will default to the appropriate data type based on your configuration.
  10. Under Error Value, choose the value to display if there is an error evaluating a value in the custom record field:
    • Choose Null to display a null value.
    • Choose Custom to enter a custom error value. The custom error value must be a literal value of the same data type as the custom field. You cannot create custom error values for custom record fields of type User.
  11. Click CREATE.

The custom record field will appear in the list of record fields with a calculator icon .

To edit the custom record field, click the edit icon . To remove a custom record field, click the delete icon .

New custom record field

Templates

Appian provides a series of templates that allow you to create a custom record field using a guided experience. These templates provide an alternative to modifying or rearchitecting your source data to fix even small changes.

Use the following templates to create your custom record fields:

Groups based on a range

The Groups based on a range template uses a range to organize your numerical data into groups. This template only supports record fields of type Number (Integer) or Number (Decimal).

To use this template, determine the range of values to include in each group. The group name will replace the numerical values in the new custom record field. You must have a minimum of two groups, and the last group will always include any remaining values that were not specifically placed in a group.

For example, let's say you have a record field called price, and you want to create a chart that shows the distribution of prices in your orders.

Using this template, you can create a new custom record field called priceGroup so all prices that are less than or equal to $10 display as Low, prices greater than $10 and less than or equal to $30 display as Medium, and all other prices display as High.

Groups based on a range

Once you create the custom record field, you can use the record type to build a chart and easily display the count of items by price group.

Groups based on text values

The Groups based on text values template allows you to organize the text values from a record field into groups. This template only supports record fields of type Text.

To use this template, specify which text values to add to each group. Use the Contains operator to include any record field values that contain a partial match to the specified keyword or keywords, or use the In operator to specify the exact record field values to include in the group.

When you add text values to a group, the group name will replace those values in the new custom record field. You must have a minimum of two groups, and the last group will always include any remaining values that were not specifically placed in a group.

For example, say you have a record field called title that contains all job titles in your organization, and you want to create a pie chart that displays the number of employees per functional area.

Using this template, you could combine all titles that contain the keyword "Software" or "Quality" into a group called Engineers. This means any employees with titles like Associate Software Engineer, Quality Engineer II, or Lead Software Engineer will appear as Engineering in the custom record field. You could create a group for each functional area using this same logic, and include any remaining titles in the Other group.

Groups based on text

With your new custom record field, you can now build a pie chart that displays the number of employees per functional area.

Groups based on a date difference

The Groups based on a date difference template allows you to calculate the difference between two dates and organize the difference into groups. This template requires two record fields of type Date or Date and Time.

To use this template, you'll first choose a unit of time like Days, Weeks, Months, or Years to calculate the difference between the two dates. The difference is returned as an Integer, which can then be organized into groups. You must have a minimum of two groups, and the last group will always include any remaining values that were not specifically placed in a group.

For example, say you have the record fields dateAssigned and dateClosed and you want to display the number of days it took to close each ticket on your record list. Using this template, you can create a custom record field that calculates the number of days between the ticket's assigned date and closed date. Then, you can organize the differences into groups:

  • The One day group includes values less than or equal to 1 day.
  • The One week group includes values greater than 1 and less than or equal to 7.
  • The Over a week group includes all remaining values.

But what if the ticket hasn't been closed? This would make the dateClosed null. To handle a null date, you can specify a Default Value to appear on the custom record field. In this example, we could set the Default Value to In Progress.

Functions that return dynamic values, like today() or now(), are not currently supported in custom record fields. To edit your custom record field, see the list of supported functions.

Groups based on date diff

Now you can easily reference this new custom record field in your record list, and even sort and filter the list by this new field.

Extract partial dates

The Extract partial dates template allows you to return a particular value from a date or date and time field. You can use this template to extract the day, month, or year from the field, or even calculate the day of the week or the quarter from a given date.

For example, say you have a Date and Time field called dateSubmitted, but you only need to know the date a ticket was submitted. You could use this template to create a custom record field called shortDateSubmitted to extract the date from the dateSubmitted field and set the new field to type Date.

Extract partial date template

Now, you can use this field to display submission dates on your record lists, records, and reports.

The Aggregate related record fields template allows you to calculate the sum, average, count, distinct count, maximum, or minimum of a related record field in a one-to-many relationship.

For example, let's say you have a Customer record type that has a one-to-many relationship with the Case record type, and you want to create a report that shows how many cases are associated with each customer.

On the Customer record type, you can use this template to create a custom record field called "totalCases" that calculates the count of Ids on the Case record type. Once you aggregate the related record field, the count of Ids will be automatically grouped by the common field shared between the two record types. In this example, that would be the customer Id.

/aggregate-related-fields

Now, you can reference this custom record field throughout your applications to quickly and easily display a calculation without any additional queries.

If you wanted to find the total number of open cases assigned to each customer, you could use the a!measure() function in a!queryRecordType() or in a records-powered chart to aggregate and filter the related data.

Write your own expression

In addition to using a guided template, you can use Write your own expression to define your custom record field in Expression mode.

When you edit a custom record field, it will also appear in Expression mode so you can make further customizations. The only exception to this is the Aggregate on Related Record Fields template, which allows you to edit the field using a guided experience.

When creating or editing a custom record field, note that constants, rules, and relationship references are not currently supported.

The following section provides a list of supported functions to use in your expressions, as well as some sample custom record field recipes. To use these recipes, you must have a record type with data sync enabled and modify the record type references to match your own record type.

When creating or editing a custom record field in Expression Mode, use the following supported functions.

Not all Appian functions can be used to create custom record fields. For a full list of functions, see the Appian Functions page.

Category Function Description
Array a!flatten()

Converts an array that contains other arrays into an array of single items.

Array a!update()

Inserts new values or replaces existing values at the specified index or field name and returns the resulting updated data.

Array append()

Appends a value or values to the given array, and returns the resulting array.

Array index()

Returns the data[index] if it is valid or else returns the default value.

Array insert()

Inserts a value into the given array and returns the resulting array.

Array joinarray()

Concatenates the elements of an array together into one string and inserts a string separator between each element.

Array ldrop()

Drops a given number of values from the left side of an array and returns the resulting array.

Array length()

This function returns the number of elements in an array.

Array rdrop()

Drops a given number of values from the right side of an array, and returns the resulting array.

Array remove()

Removes the value at a given index from an array, and returns the resulting array.

Array reverse()

Returns an array in reverse order.

Array updatearray()

Inserts new values or modifies existing values at the specified index of a given array, and returns the resulting array.

Array where()

Returns the indices where the values in the input array are true.

Array wherecontains()

Receives one or more values and returns an array of indices that indicate the position of the values within the array.

Base Conversion bin2dec()

Converts a Binary number as text to a Decimal number.

Base Conversion bin2hex()

Converts a Binary number as text to a Hex number as text.

Base Conversion bin2oct()

Converts a Binary number as text to an Octal number as text.

Base Conversion dec2bin()

Converts a Decimal number to a Binary number as text.

Base Conversion dec2hex()

Converts a Decimal number to a Binary number as text.

Base Conversion dec2oct()

Converts a Decimal number to an Octal number as text.

Base Conversion hex2bin()

Converts a Hex number as text to a Binary number as text.

Base Conversion hex2dec()

Converts a Hex number as text to a Decimal number.

Base Conversion hex2oct()

Converts a Hex number as text to an Octal number as text.

Base Conversion oct2bin()

Converts an Octal number as text to a Binary number as text.

Base Conversion oct2dec()

Converts an Octal number as text to a Decimal number.

Base Conversion oct2hex()

Converts an Octal number as text to a Hex number as text.

Conversion displayvalue()

Tries to match a value in a given array with a value at the same index in a replacement array and returns either the value at the same index or a default value if the value is not found.

Conversion externalize()

Converts the given value to a string representation so that it can be saved externally.

Conversion toboolean()

Converts a value to Boolean.

Conversion todate()

Converts a value to Date with Timezone.

Conversion todatetime()

Converts a value to Date and Time.

Conversion todecimal()

Converts a value to Decimal (double precision floating point).

Conversion toemailaddress()

Converts a value to email address.

Conversion tointeger()

Converts a value to Integer.

Conversion tointervalds()

Converts a value to Interval (Day to Second).

Conversion tostring()

Converts a value to Text.

Conversion totime()

Converts a value to Time.

Conversion touniformstring()

Converts a value to Text, preserving the original scalar or array structure.

Date and Time caladddays()

This function adds a given number of working days as designated on the process calendar to a Date and Time value, and returns a Date and Time value that falls within the work time defined in the process calendar.

Date and Time caladdhours()

This function adds a given number of hours to a Date and Time plus any non-working hours (as designated on the process calendar) and returns the resulting Date and Time.

Date and Time calisworkday()

This returns whether or not the given Date and Time is a work day, according to the calendar defined for the system.

Date and Time calisworktime()

This returns whether or not the given Date and Time is within working hours, according to the calendars defined for the system.

Date and Time calworkdays()

This returns the actual number of work days between two Date and Times (both inclusive), according to the calendar defined for the system.

Date and Time calworkhours()

This returns the actual number of work hours between two given Date and Times (both inclusive), according to the calendar defined for the system.

Date and Time date()

Converts text into data accepted by the date data type and functions that require date parameters.

Date and Time datetime()

Converts the given Date and Time into a serial number that holds the Date and Time data type.

Date and Time datevalue()

Converts a value to a date.

Date and Time day()

Returns the day of the month from the day specified.

Date and Time dayofyear()

Returns the day number within the year.

Date and Time days360()

Returns the number of days between two dates, based on a 360-day calendar.

Date and Time daysinmonth()

Returns the number of days in the given month in the given year.

Date and Time edate()

Returns the date that is the number of months before or after the given starting date.

Date and Time eomonth()

Returns the date for the last day of the month that is the number of months before or after the given starting date.

Date and Time gmt()

Subtracts a time zone offset from a given Date and Time.

Date and Time hour()

Returns the hour from the time specified.

Date and Time intervalds()

Converts the given time components into an equivalent time duration, an interval expressing days to seconds. This value is treated as a duration (Joe ran the marathon in 3 hours and 23 minutes), not a point in time.

Date and Time isleapyear()

Returns a Boolean value for whether the given year is a leap year.

Date and Time lastndays()

Returns a Boolean value for whether the given date is within the last given number of days.

Date and Time local()

This is a Date and Time addition function, adding time zone offset to given Date and Time.

Date and Time milli()

This function returns the millisecond portion of a timestamp or the decimal number that represents 1 millisecond in days.

Date and Time minute()

Returns the minute from the time specified.

Date and Time month()

Returns the month from the specified date.

Date and Time networkdays()

Returns the number of working days between two specified dates.

Date and Time second()

Returns the seconds from the specified time.

Date and Time time()

Converts the given time into an equivalent time value.

Date and Time timevalue()

Converts the given time into an equivalent interval.

Date and Time timezone()

Returns the default offset in minutes from GMT, which is generally the process initiator's time zone.

Date and Time timezoneid()

Returns the time zone ID for the current context.

Date and Time weekday()

Returns the day of the week of the specified date.

Date and Time weeknum()

Returns the week number within the year for the given date using a given methodology.

Date and Time workday()

Returns the date the given number of workdays before or after the given date.

Date and Time year()

Returns the year for the date specified.

Date and Time yearfrac()

Determine the fraction of the year.

Evaluation a!localVariables()

Lets you define one or more local variables for use within an expression. When used within an interface, the value of each variable can be refreshed under a variety of conditions, configured using a!refreshVariable(). When used outside of an interface, all refresh properties configured using a!refreshVariable() are ignored.

Evaluation load()

Lets you define local variables within an expression for an interface and evaluate the expression with the new variables, then re-evaluate the function with the local variables' values from the previous evaluation.

Evaluation with()

Lets you define local variables within a function and evaluate the expression with the new variables.

Informational a!defaultValue()

Returns a default value when the specified value is null or empty. When there are multiple default parameters, each parameter is evaluated in order and the first non-null and non-empty default will be returned. Null, "", and {} are all considered null or empty values.

Informational cast()

Converts a value from its existing type to the specified type.

Informational error()

Raises an error with the given message, used for invalidating execution.This function never returns a value.

Informational infinity()

Represents a constant number that stands for positive infinity or a negative infinity if you negate the value.

Informational isinfinite()

Tests given numbers against positive and negative infinity, returning true if the number is infinite, false if the number is not infinite.

Informational isnegativeinfinity()

Tests given numbers against negative infinity, returning true if number is negative infinity, false if number is not negative infinity.

Informational isnull()

Returns true if value is null, false otherwise.

Informational ispositiveinfinity()

Tests given numbers against positive infinity, returning true if the numbers are positive infinity, false if the numbers are not positive infinity.

Informational nan()

Constant number representing Not A Number, generally used for comparison to the result of mathematical operations with invalid inputs. This is equivalent to a decimal (floating point) null, but nan() is provided for more explicit usage in mathematical expressions.

Informational null⠀()

Returns a null value.

Informational runtimetypeof()

Returns the numerical representation of an Appian system data type when used during process execution.

Informational typename()

Returns the type name of a given type number.

Informational typeof()

Returns the type number of a given value.

Logical and()

Returns true if all inputs are true; returns false if at least one input is false.

Logical choose()

Evaluates the choice argument at the given index and returns the result.

Logical false()

Returns the Boolean value false.

Logical if()

Returns valueIfTrue if condition returns true; returns valueIfFalse otherwise.

Logical not()

Converts true into false, and false into true.

Logical or()

Returns true if any inputs are true; returns false if all inputs are false.

Logical true()

Returns the Boolean value true.

Looping a!forEach()

Evaluates an expression for each item in a list and returns a new array of the results.

Looping all()

Calls a rule or function that returns either true or false for each item in list, asks the question, "Do all items in this list yield true for this rule/function?", and returns true if all items in list evaluates to true.

Looping any()

Calls a rule or function that returns either true or false for each item in list by asking the question, "Do any items in this list yield true for this rule/function?" with the intent to discover if any item(s) yield true.

Looping apply()

Calls a rule or function for each item in a list, and provides any contexts specified.

Looping filter()

Calls a predicate for each item in a list and returns any items for which the returned value is true.

Looping merge()

Takes a variable number of lists and merges them into a single list (or a list of lists) that is the size of the largest list provided.

Looping none()

Calls a rule or function that returns either true or false for each item in list by asking the question, "Do all items in this list yield false for this rule/function?" with the intent to discover if no items will yield true.

Looping reduce()

Calls a rule or function for each item in a list, passing the result of each call to the next one, and returns the value of the last computation.

Looping reject()

Calls a predicate for each item in a list, rejects any items for which the returned value is true, and returns all remaining items.

Mathematical abs()

Returns the absolute value(s) of the specified number(s).

Mathematical ceiling()

Rounds the number up to the nearest multiple of the specified significance.

Mathematical combin()

Calculates the number of unique ways to choose m elements from a pool of n elements.

Mathematical a!distanceBetween()

Returns the distance between the two locations (in meters) specified by the start and end coordinates. The distance is calculated by tracing a line between the two locations that follows the curvature of the Earth, and measuring the length of the resulting arc.

Mathematical e()

Returns the value of e.

Mathematical enumerate()

Returns a list of integer numbers from 0 through n-1.

Mathematical even()

Rounds positive numbers up to nearest even integer and negative numbers down to the nearest even integer.

Mathematical exp()

Returns e raised to the specified power.

Mathematical fact()

The factorial of specified number.

Mathematical factdouble()

The double factorial of specified number (mathematically n!!).

Mathematical floor()

Rounds the number down to the nearest multiple of the specified significance.

Mathematical int()

Rounds the specified number down to the nearest integer.

Mathematical ln()

Returns the natural logarithm of the specified number, which is the power that e must be raised to in order to equal the specified number.

Mathematical log()

Returns the logarithm of the number using the specified base, which is the power that base must be raised to, to equal the number.

Mathematical mod()

Returns the remainder of dividend when divided by the divisor.

Mathematical mround()

Rounds the number to the specified multiple.

Mathematical multinomial()

Adds the specified integers and divides the factorial of the sum by the factorial of the individual numbers.

Mathematical odd()

Rounds positive numbers up to nearest odd integer and negative numbers down to the nearest odd integer.

Mathematical pi()

Returns the value of pi.

Mathematical power()

Returns the base number raised to the specified exponent.

Mathematical product()

Returns the product of the specified numbers.

Mathematical quotient()

Returns the quotient when numerator is divided by the denominator, and drops the remainder.

Mathematical round()

Rounds off the number to the specified number of digits.

Mathematical rounddown()

Rounds the number down to the specified digit.

Mathematical roundup()

Rounds the number up to the specified digit.

Mathematical sign()

Returns the number divided by its absolute value, which is 1 if the number is positive and -1 if the number is negative.

Mathematical sqrt()

Returns the square root(s) of the specified number(s).

Mathematical sqrtpi()

Multiplies the number by pi, then returns the square root of the product.

Mathematical sum()

Returns the sum of the specified numbers.

Mathematical sumsq()

Squares each number and then returns the sum of the squares.

Mathematical trunc()

Truncates a decimal number to the specified number of places after the decimal point.

Scripting offsetFromGMT()

Returns the offset (in minutes) from GMT of the given date and timezone.

Scripting property()

This function extracts a bean's property under a given key name (the nameOfProperty parameter).

Array contains()

Checks whether an array contains the value.

Array difference()

Returns the values in array1 and not in array2.

Array intersection()

Returns only those elements that appear in all of the given arrays.

Array symmetricdifference()

Returns the values unique to two arrays but are not in the intersection of them.

Array union()

Returns all unique elements from the given arrays.

Statistical avedev()

Returns the average deviation of the specified number(s).

Statistical average()

Returns the average of the specified number(s).

Statistical count()

Returns the number items in all arrays passed to the function.

Statistical frequency()

Uses the bin array to create groups bounded by the elements of the array.

Statistical gcd()

Returns the greatest common denominator of the specified non-negative number(s), which is the largest number that divides all the given numbers without a remainder.

Statistical geomean()

Returns the geometric mean of the specified number(s).

Statistical harmean()

Returns the harmonic mean of the specified number(s), which is the number of terms divided by the sum of the terms' reciprocals.

Statistical lcm()

Returns the least common multiple of the specified non-negative number(s), which is the smallest number that is a multiple of all the given numbers.

Statistical lookup()

Returns location of data within multiple values, or valueIfNotPresent.

Statistical max()

Returns the maximum of the specified number(s).

Statistical median()

Returns the median of the specified number(s).

Statistical min()

Returns the minimum of the specified number(s).

Statistical mode()

Returns the mode of the specified number(s), which is the most commonly repeated element.

Statistical rank()

Returns an integer representing the rank of the number in the specified array.

Statistical stdev()

Returns the standard deviation of the specified number(s).

Statistical stdevp()

Returns the standard deviation of the specified number(s), assuming that the numbers form the entire data set and not just a sample.

Statistical var()

Returns the variance of the specified number(s).

Statistical varp()

Returns the variance of the specified number(s), assuming that the numbers form the entire data set and not just a sample.

System a!map()

Creates a map of values (Any Type) with each value stored at the corresponding string key. Values stored in maps are not wrapped in variants.

Text char()

Converts a number into its Unicode character equivalent.

Text charat()

Returns the character at given index within specified string.

Text clean()

Returns the specified text, minus any characters not considered printable. Printable characters are the 95 printable ASCII characters plus three special characters: BACKSPACE (0x08), TAB (0x09), and NEWLINE (0x0a).

Text cleanwith()

Returns the specified text, minus any characters not in the list of valid characters.

Text code()

Converts the text into Unicode integers.

Text concat()

Concatenates the specified strings into one string, without a separator.

Text exact()

Compares two given text strings in a case-sensitive manner, returning true only if they are exactly the same.

Text extract()

Returns the value (or values, if the text contains multiple delimited values) between the delimiters from the given text.

Text extractanswers()

Returns an array of strings that respond to the questions provided.

Text find()

Returns index location of case-sensitive substring with given string.

Text fixed()

Rounds the specified number off to a certain number of decimals and returns it as text, with optional commas.

Text initials()

Returns only the uppercase characters from within the given text.

Text insertkey()

Returns the provided text, wrapped with the specified delimiters.

Text insertkeyval()

Returns the provided key-value pairs, wrapped with the specified delimiters.

Text insertquestions()

Returns an array of questions with a ==EOQ== at the end, returning a single string that can be parsed with extractanswers() function after it has been filled in by a user.

Text keyval()

Returns the value(s) associated with the given key(s).

Text left()

Returns a specified number of characters from the text, starting from the first character.

Text leftb()

Returns a specified number of bytes from the text, starting from the first byte.

Text len()

Returns the length in characters of the text.

Text lenb()

Returns the length in bytes of the text.

Text like()

Tests whether a string of text is like a given pattern.

Text lower()

Converts all characters in the text into lowercase (Unicode case folding).

Text mid()

Returns a substring from the middle of the specified text.

Text midb()

Returns a substring from the middle of the specified text.

Text padleft()

Pads text with spaces on the left so that it is a certain length.

Text padright()

Pads text with spaces on the right so that it is a certain length.

Text proper()

Converts each character in the text into proper case, meaning it will capitalize the first first letter of every word and convert the rest into lowercase.

Text replace()

Replaces a piece of the specified text with new text.

Text replaceb()

Replaces a piece of the specified text with new text.

Text rept()

Concatenates the text to itself a specified number of times and returns the result.

Text resource()

Retrieves a string of translated text appropriate for the current user, according to their language preference, by matching a given key with text.

Text right()

Returns a specified number of characters from the text, starting from the last character.

Text search()

Searches the text for a particular substring, returning the positional index of the first character of the first match.

Text searchb()

Searches the text for a particular substring, returning the positional index of the first byte of the first match.

Text soundex()

Returns the soundex code, used to render similar sounding names via phonetic similarities into identical four (4) character codes.

Text split()

Splits text into a list of text elements, delimited by the text specified in the separator.

Text strip()

Returns the provided text, minus any characters considered printable. Printable characters are the 95 printable ASCII characters plus three special characters: BACKSPACE (0x08), TAB (0x09), and NEWLINE (0x0a).

Text stripHtml()

Changes the provided HTML string into a plain text string by converting <br>, <p>, and <div> to line breaks, stripping all other tags, and converting escaped characters into their display values.

Text stripwith()

The function returns the provided text, minus any characters on the list of invalid characters.

Text substitute()

Substitutes a specific part of a string with another string.

Text toHtml()

Converts a string in plain text to the HTML equivalent that displays appropriately in an HTML page, by replacing reserved characters with their escaped counterparts.

Text trim()

Removes all unnecessary spaces from the text.

Text upper()

Converts all letters in the text into uppercase.

Text value()

Converts text representing a number into an actual number or datetime.

Trigonometry acos()

Returns the arccosine(s) of the specified number(s) in radians.

Trigonometry acosh()

Returns the hyperbolic arccosine(s) of the specified number(s) in radians.

Trigonometry asin()

Returns the arcsine(s) of the specified number(s) in radians.

Trigonometry asinh()

Returns the hyperbolic arcsine(s) of the specified number(s) in radians.

Trigonometry atan()

Returns the arctangent(s) of the specified number(s) in radians.

Trigonometry atanh()

Returns the hyperbolic arctangent(s) of the specified number(s) in radians.

Trigonometry cos()

Returns the cosine(s) of the specified number(s).

Trigonometry cosh()

Returns the hyperbolic cosine(s) of the specified number(s).

Trigonometry degrees()

Converts the measure(s) of the specified angle(s) from radians to degrees.

Trigonometry radians()

Converts the measure of the specified angle from degrees to radians.

Trigonometry sin()

Returns the sine(s) of the specified number(s).

Trigonometry sinh()

Returns the hyperbolic sine(s) of the specified number(s).

Trigonometry tan()

Returns the tangent(s) of the specified number(s).

Trigonometry tanh()

Returns the hyperbolic tangent(s) of the specified number(s).

Concatenate existing values

Goal: Create a new custom record field that concatenates existing record fields and displays them as one value.

In this example, we will use the concat() function to concatenate the record fields street, city, state, and zipCode from the Employee record type into a new custom record field called address:

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concat(rv!record[recordType!employee.fields.street], ", ", 
rv!record[recordType!employee.fields.city],  ",  ", 
rv!record[recordType!employee.fields.state], " ", 
rv!record[recordType!employee.fields.zip]) 

Replace null values

Goal: Create a new custom record field that displays the null values in a record field as "N/A".

In this example, we'll create a new custom record field called cleanReference that displays any null values from the reference record field as "N/A". If the value is not null, then the record value will display.

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a!defaultValue(rv!record[recordType!applicant.fields.reference], "N/A")

Use conditional logic with two record fields

Goal: Create a new custom record field with values based on the conditions of two existing fields.

In this example, we'll use the record fields urgency and supportLevel to determine a ticket's priority level. Based on the value of each field, the new custom record field will display values of "High", "Medium", or "Low".

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if (and(
rv!record[recordType!case.fields.urgency] = 1,
rv!record[recordType!case.fields.supportLevel] = 3
	),
"High",
	if(and(
rv!record[recordType!case.fields.urgency] = 2,
rv!record[recordType!case.fields.supportLevel] = 2
	),
"Medium",
"Low"
)
)

Create percentages

Goal: Create a new custom record field that performs a calculation on existing values and displays the values as a percentage.

In this example, we'll calculate the return on investment (ROI) using the record fields revenue and totalExpenses. When you add this field in a report or grid, you can use rich text to add the percent sign. For example, rv!record[recordType!roi] & "%".

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(rv!record[recordType!sales.fields.revenue] - rv!record[recordType!sales.fields.totalExpenses]) 
/ rv!record[recordType!sales.fields.totalExpenses] * 100

Perform arithmetic calculations

Goal: Create a new custom record field that uses arithmetic to calculate its values.

In this example, we'll use the record fields price, cost, and unitsSold to calculate the values for the new custom record field called profit.

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(rv!record[recordType!Sales.fields.price] - rv!record[recordType!Sales.fields.cost])
* fv!record[recordType!Sales.fields.unitsSold]
Open in Github Built: Fri, Sep 17, 2021 (04:02:57 PM)

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